Submit :
News                      Photos                     Just In                     Debate Topic                     Latest News                    Articles                    Local News                    Blog Posts                     Pictures                    Reviews                    Recipes                    
  
Sikh volunteers from Khalsa Aid reach Bangladesh-Myanmar border to feed Rohingya Muslim refugees
Volunteers of Khalsa Aid, a Sikh organisation, reached Bangladesh-Myanmar border on Sunday night in order to provide relief to lakhs of Rohingya Muslim refugees who have been rejected by Myanmar.

Speaking to The Indian Express over phone, Amarpreet Singh, Managing Director of Khalsa Aid said, "It was our first day here today and we did a pre-assessment before launching a major relief operation. We had come prepared for providing relief to some 50,000 people, but there are more than three lakh refugees here. They are living without water, food, clothes and shelter. They are sitting wherever they can find a corner. It is raining, but people do not have anywhere to go. It is miserable to say the least. We will be providing them langar food (community kitchen) and shelter. We are arranging tarpaulins but since the number of refugees has overwhelmingly exceeded our preparations, it can take some time to make arrangements."

The volunteers from the Khalsa Aid team are now serving langar and water to the Rohingya refugees.

"Teknaf is almost 10 hours ride from the capital Dhaka from where we are ferrying all the material needed to prepare langar. Connectivity issues and rain are creating hindrances but we are trying our best to provide food to the maximum people at the earliest. The langar will continue here till crisis is not over and refugees continue to reach the border," he further added.

"Another Khalsa Aid team is expected to reach Teknaf in the next few days to provide necessities such as food, clothes, shelter, water, medicines to the Rohingya community," said Amarpreet.

The Rohingyas are the world's largest stateless ethnic group who are Muslim by religion, and have not been recognised as citizens by the Myanmar government.

The minority community has faced multiple restrictions, including on their movement, access to the economy, education, health and other rights, which keep them in poverty.

COMMENTS (1)
Guest
Name
Email Id
Verification Code
Email me on reply to my comment
Email me when other CJs comment on this article
}
Sign in to set your preference
Advertisement
merinews for RTI activists


Advertisement
Not finding what you are looking for? Search here.